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Inflation | Economic Reports
Consumer Price Index (CPI)
The Consumer Price Index (CPI), is a measure of the average change over time in the prices paid by urban consumers for a market basket of consumer goods and services in a country. The CPI does not include stocks and Bonds or Real Estate.
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CPI - PPI - Core PCE - I/E Prices - ECI - Compare All
Consumer Price Index (CPI)
  Release Schedule 2021: USA Consumer Price Index (CPI) Economics   Inflation
Consumer Price Index (CPI)
2021 SCHEDULE
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Released Date:
Released Week:
Released Day:
Prior:
-0.3%
0.4%
                   
Prior Revised:
No
0.2%
                   
CONSENSUS:
1.5%
0.3%
                   
Consensus Low:
-0.1%
0.1%
                   
Consensus High:
0.3%
0.4%
                   
CPI M/M:
0.4%
0.3%
                   
CPI Y/Y:
1.6%
1.4%
                   
RATING
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REAL CPI - CHART 1947 to Present
         
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Deflation and Inflation

Deflation is the opposite of inflation — a continuous decrease in prices, or continue rise in the dollar’s value.

During the Great Depression, Americans experience deflation at its worst. Prices plunged, and no one had money to spend, hire, build or do much of anything

Deflation often reduces demand since consumer spending on good and services is greatly reduced. That in turn, can lead to increasing unemployment

Inflation (along with various risks) basically explains how interest rates are set on everything from your mortgage and auto loans to Treasury bills, notes and bonds.

If someone borrows $100 dollars from you today and promises to repay it in one year with interest, how much interest should you charge.

Lower inflation gives consumers more spending power, which boosts growth. It also gives the Federal Reserve more leeway to keep interest rates low and take other steps to boost the economy.

A small amount of inflation can be good for the economy. It encourages businesses and consumers to spend and invest money sooner rather than later, before inflation erodes its value.

While the CPI is the price index with the most impact in setting interest rates, the PPI provides significant information earlier in the production process.

 
CPI: Consumer Price Index

How the CPI affects investors?

CPI is the most widely cited inflation indicator. The CPI affects nearly all Americans because of the many ways it is used. Following are major uses:

1. As an Economic Indicator
2. As a Deflator of other economic series.
3. As a means of adjusting US dollar values.

Is the CPI the best measure of inflation?

Inflation has been defined as a process of continuously rising prices or equivalently, of a continuously falling value of money. Various indexes have been devised to measure different aspects of inflation:

The "best" measure of inflation for a given application depends on the intended use of the data. The CPI is generally the best measure for adjusting payments to consumers when the intent is to allow consumers to purchase at today's prices, a market basket of goods and services equivalent to one that they could purchase in an earlier period.

The CPI is the broadest of three price gauges from the Labor Department because it includes goods and services. About 60% of the index covers prices consumers pay for services from medical visits to airline fares, movie tickets and rents.

Inflation Rate

A Consumer Price Index of 158 indicates 58% inflation since 1982, the commonly quoted inflation rate of say 3% is actually the change in the Consumer Price Index from a year earlier.

By looking at the change in the index we can see that what cost an average of 9.9 cents in 1913 would cost us about $1.82 in 2003.

Is the CPI a cost-of-living index?

The CPI frequently is called a cost-of-living index, but it differs in important ways from a complete cost-of-living measure.

A cost-of-living index would measure changes over time in the amount that consumers need to spend to reach a certain utility level or standard of living.

Both the CPI and a cost-of-living index would reflect changes in the prices of goods and services, such as food and clothing, that are directly purchased in the marketplace; but a complete cost-of-living index would go beyond this role to also take into account changes in other governmental or environmental factors that affect consumers' well-being.

The annual (U.S.) cost of living

The inflation gauge most closely watched by the Fed, the Commerce Department's core personal consumption expenditures price index excluding food and energy

         
   
Consumer Price Index (CPI) - Inflation rate Chart for U.S.
         
         
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Related Links
Consumer Price Index (CPI)  
  Pruder Price Index (CPI)  
  Core PCE  
  Import/Export Price Indexes  
  Fed Fund Rate  
  GDP  
  Global View  
  Register  
DATA INFORMATION CONSUMER PRICE INDEX
SOURCE Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), U.S. Department of Labor
WEB www.bls.gov
FREQUENCY Monthly
AVAILABILITY Mid-month
COVERAGE Data are for the previous month. Data for June are released in July.
REVISIONS No
IMPORTANCE Inflation - Very Important
         
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