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U.S.APERFORMANCE SUMMARY
         
         
 
1. 19/Oct/1987
 
         
         
 
EXPLANATION

The S&P 500 Index, shown in bright red, delivered its worst five-year return of -6.6% a year over the five years ending in February 2009.

The best five-year return of 30% occurred over the five years ending in July 1987.

Using stock market data from 2000 to 2020, the best month to buy stocks is April, as the S&P500 has increased an average of 2.4% in 15 of the last 20 years. ...

Our data research shows that from 2000 to 2020, the worst month for stocks is September, with an average loss of -0.83%

The S&P 500 Index originally began in 1926 as the "composite index" comprised of only 90 stocks.1

According to historical records, the average annual return since its inception in 1926 through 2018 is approximately 10%–11%

What is the largest stock market loss in one day?

The largest single-day percentage loss in the history of the Dow remains 'Black Monday' in October 1987

What is the biggest stock gain in one day?

1 1933-03-15 +8.26
2 1931-10-06 +12.86
3 1929-10-30 +28.40

   
EXPLANATION

Historically, December is the best performed month;

March, April, November and December are showing good performance in average;

Generally, the S&P 500 index is traded more up - in average 9 month in a year;

Historically, September is the worst month of a year and August is the second worst performed month of a year

What month is historically the worst month for stocks?

September Since 1950, September has been the worst month of the year for stocks on average. And when Aug

   
 
EXPLANATION

Investors are facing the specific events in certain periods of a year. Some example are

Each May we have First Quarter earning reports, each August we have Second Quarter earning reports and etc.

Every forth year in November we have President's election;

Every August many institutional traders leave on vacation and we have low volume trading.

Each November we have Thanksgiving sales - Black Friday which spread over a month.

Each December we have Holiday season - we have boosted sale numbers and some traders leave on vacation and some institutional traders are making ear-closing trades in reparation to yearly reports and tax season.

Each February-April we have tax season.

     
  Up
     
  Up
   
No Year Dow 30 S&P 500 Nasdaq Tick
107 2021 3.04% 3.34% 4.48% Up
106 2020 7.25% 15.76% 43.64% Up
105 2019 22.34% 30.43% 35.23% Up
104 2018 -5.63% -6.59% -3.88% Down
103 2017 25.08% 18.74% 28.24% Up
102 2016 13.42% 9.84% 7.50% Up
101 2015 -2.23% -0.73% 5.73% Down
100 2014 7.52% 11.54% 13.40% Up
99 2013 26.50% 29.60% 38.32% Up
98 2012 7.26% 13.29% 15.91% Up
97 2011 5.53% 0.00% -1.80% Down
96 2010 11.02% 12.64% 16.91% Up
95 2009 18.82% 23.49% 43.89% Up
94 2008 -33.84% -38.47% -40.54% Down
93 2007 6.43% 3.55% 9.81% Up
92 2006 16.29% 13.62% 9.52% Up
91 2005 -0.61% 3.00% 1.37% Up
90 2004 3.15% 8.99% 8.59% Up
89 2003 25.32% 26.38% 50.01% Up
88 2002 -16.76% -23.37% -31.53% Down
87 2001 -7.10% -13.04% -21.05% Down
86 2000 -6.17% -10.14% -39.29% Down
85 1999 25.22% 19.53% 85.59% Up
84 1998 16.10% 26.67% 39.63% Up
83 1997 22.64% 31.01% 21.64% Up
82 1996 26.01% 20.26% 22.71% Up
81 1995 33.45% 34.13% 39.92% Up
80 1994 2.14% -1.55% -3.20% Down
79 1993 13.72% 7.06% 14.75% Up
78 1992 4.17% 4.48% 15.45% Up
77 1991 20.32% 26.31% 56.86% Up
76 1990 -4.34% -6.56% -17.81% Down
75 1989 26.96% 27.25% 19.24% Up
74 1988 11.85% 12.39% 15.40% Up
73 1987 2.26% 2.03% -5.25% Up
72 1986 22.58% 14.62% 7.36% Up
71 1985 27.66% 26.36% 31.49% Up
70 1984 -3.74% 1.40% -11.31% Down
69 1983 20.27% 17.26% 19.87% Up
68 1982 19.60% 14.76% 18.67% Up
67 1981 -9.23% -9.73% -3.21% Down
66 1980 14.93% 25.77% 33.88% Up
65 1979 4.19% 12.31% 28.11% Up
64 1978 -3.15% 1.06% 12.31% Up
63 1977 -17.27% -11.50% 7.33% Down
62 1976 17.86% 19.15% 26.10% Up
61 1975 38.32% 31.38% 29.76% Up
60 1974 -27.57% -29.72% -35.11% Down
59 1973 -16.58% -17.37% -31.06% Down
58 1972 14.58% 15.63% Up
57 1971 6.11% 10.79% Up
56 1970 4.82% 0.10% Up
55 1969 -15.19% -11.36% Down
54 1968 4.27% 7.66% Up
53 1967 15.20% 20.09% Up
52 1966 -18.94% -13.09% Down
51 1965 10.88% 9.06% Up
50 1964 14.57% 12.97% Up
49 1963 17.00% 18.89% Up
48 1962 -10.81% -11.81% Down
47 1961 18.71% 24.28% Up
46 1960 -9.34% -3.00% Down
45 1959 16.40% 8.03% Up
44 1958 33.96% 36.90% Up
43 1957 -12.77% -13.44% Down
42 1956 2.27% 3.34% Up
41 1955 20.77% 23.76% Up
40 1954 43.96% 44.21% Up
39 1953 -3.77% -6.52% Down
38 1952 8.42% 11.64% Up
37 1951 14.37% 14.44% Up
36 1950 17.63% 22.51% Up
35 1949 12.88% 12.11% Up
34 1948 -2.13% -0.91% Down
33 1947 2.23% 0.66% Up
32 1946 -8.14% -11.30% Down
31 1945 26.65% 30.23% Up
30 1944 12.09% 13.89% Up
29 1943 13.81% 18.60% Up
28 1942 7.61% 9.90% Up
27 1941 -15.38% -17.08% Down
26 1940 -12.72% -16.23% Down
25 1939 -2.92% -4.51% Down
24 1938 28.06% 25.57% Up
23 1937 -32.82% -38.01% Down
22 1936 24.82% 28.21% Up
21 1935 38.53% 41.22% Up
20 1934 4.14% -6.03% Down
19 1933 66.69% 47.88% Up
18 1932 -23.07% -11.89% Down
17 1931 -52.67% -48.77% Down
16 1930 -33.77% -27.57% Down
15 1929 -17.17% -13.54% Down
14 1928 49.48% 37.11% Up
13 1927 27.67% Up
12 1926 4.05% Up
11 1925 25.37% Up
10 1924 26.16% Up
9 1923 -2.70% Down
8 1922 21.50% Up
7 1921 12.30% Up
6 1920 -32.90% Down
5 1919 30.45% Up
4 1918 10.51% Up
3 1917 -21.71% Down
2 1916 -4.19% Down
1 1915 81.49% Up
   
     
         
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S&P 500 INDEX

The Cash Index

The S&P 500 index would be a typical benchmark for a U.S large-cap stock fund because it tracks 500 U.S large-cap stocks. The goal for an active fund manager is to consistently outperform the appropriate benchmark after fees are deducted. Every year a significant number of active mutual funds do beat their indexes; the challenge for individual investors is selecting those ones that will continue to outperform the market over time.

During the past ten years, S&P 500 index funds suffered through rough markets and then rebounded to deliver solid results. Over the decade, SDPR S&P 500 ETF SPY returned 8.0% annually. The strong record has not gone unnoticed. During the past year, shareholders poured $18.6 billion into the SPDR ETF.

But investors could have done even better with SPDR Dow Jones Industrial Average DIA , which returned 8.3% annually over the past ten years. The Dow Jones ETF seems particularly notable because it was less volatile than the S&P 500. During recent downturns, the Dow has outdone the S&P 500 by comfortable margins.

The Dow average is a peculiar contraption that may not excel in every market. But there is a strong case for shock-proofing a portfolio by putting a limited amount of assets into the Dow.

The Dow

Charles Dow created his index in 1896 by adding up the prices of 12 stocks. Since then, the benchmark has been expanded to include 30 leading companies that are broadly representative of the U.S. economy.

A Dow Jones committee picks the names, seeking to find dominant businesses that should maintain their strong positions because of their competitive advantages. The committee's judgments are subjective, and there are no mechanical rules dictating when new names must be included. Still, the committee has proven adept over the years, selecting rock-solid blue chips..

What is the difference between Dow Jones, Nasdaq, and S&P 500?

The Dow Jones Industrial average is a market scorecard with just 30 stocks maintained by Dow Jones & Co., the publishers of the Wall Street Journal, soon to be part of Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. Dow Jones doesn't handle stock trades, it just covers the markets and provides all kinds of market data.

The Standard and Poor's 500 index is a market-weighted average of 500 stocks picked by the editors at Standard and Poor's, which is a part of the publisher McGraw Hill. They also don't handle stock trades.

The Nasdaq (originally the National Association of Stock Dealers Automated Quotations) began as a network of dealers that bought and sold stocks over the phone. Today, the Nasdaq is operated over a big computer network that is tied into brokers and individual investors who trade online. In some cases, the computer matches up the trade. In other cases, dealers who specialize in certain stocks that are listed on the Nasdaq exchange make a market in that stock which means they match orders from buyers and sellers.

The other major U.S. stock trading site is the New York Stock Exchange, which has a physical trading floor with specialists who work at trading posts matching up buy and sell orders for specific stocks. Generally, the companies that are listed on the NYSE are larger than those listed on the Nasdaq.

Other U.S. stock exchanges include the American Stock Exchange (AMEX) and several regional exchanges. Some companies are listed on more than one exchange.
When you deal with an online brokerage like E*TRADE, you can choose how you'd like to have your order routed. If you don't, the brokerage decides for you and the trade is handled by an independent dealer.

         
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Abbreviation Guide:
World stock market performance of all the major World indices. Get a global market overview, current values and quotes of major world indexes in North America, Europe, Asia and South America.

K = Thousands; M = Millions; B = Billions
mrq = Most Recent Quarter
ttm = Trailing Twelve Months
yoy = Year Over Year
lfy = Last Fiscal Year
fye = Fiscal Year Ending
Currency: Quotes in USD.
Shares outstanding: taken from the most recently filed quarterly or annual report.
Market Cap: calculated using shares outstanding.
EBITDA: calculated by Capital IQ using methodology that may differ from that used by a company in its reporting
         
         
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